Thursday, November 13, 2014

Newly published. Traditionalism: the only radicalism




Newly published. Traditionalism: the only radicalism. By John Dunn. Back in stock at Amazon.
A new mythos for modern heretics.
Extracts from the new book.

The dualism of mind and material world became manifest in the the separation of the economic sphere from the religious and moral sphere, leaving the individual at least notionally free to lead a parallel desacralised life, accumulating wealth in a way that would have been once abhorrent to the church and society at large in the pre-Reformation world. John Dunn new book. For a life led in pursuit of financial gain was considered sinful, and gain through usury, the lending of money for interest, the worst form of this avaricious sin.

The dualism was manifested too in political struggle, with an individual liberty, based on the claim that introspectively based judgements about one’s own mental states are infallible, underpinning the related philosophies of liberalism, Marxism and anarchism. 

From Traditionalism the Only Radicalism. Available on www.amazon.co.uk

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com



Monday, September 01, 2014

The bankers were excluded. A serious rival to Usura had been established

As soon as the attention turned to taxing the Americans, the British-based banking interests found the colonialists printing their own paper money, known as colonial scrip. John Dunn on scrip. The American colonies were a particularly attractive tax prospect, because of their prosperity.

The debt free issue of currency on such a scale in the colonies posed a threat to the interest charging power of the Usurocracy, which hurriedly pressed the British Parliament to pass the 1764 Currency Act. This action immediately suppressed the printing of money by the colonists, and forced them to pay taxes to Britain in silver or gold. In this draconian measure lay the principle cause of Usura’s next conflict, the American Revolutionary War of 1775–1783. It had nothing to do with the more picturesque matters, such as the Boston Tea Party of the Whig history books, which was just as much a diversion from the truth as the Pudding Lane origins of London’s great fire.

Such was the centrality of the money issue to the cause of the American revolutionists that upon victory, the power allotted to Congress ‘to coin money and regulate the value thereof’ was included in the Constitution of the new nation. John Dunn new book. The bankers were excluded. A serious rival to Usura had been established.

 
From Traditionalism the Only Radicalism. Available on www.amazon.co.uk

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, August 30, 2014

A new mythos for modern heretics

It is a feature of twenty first century modernity that the tenets around which society is built and organised exist unchallenged. When there is only one cultural perspective and no alternative story, where is the judgement about the worth of the existing regime meant to come from? The left-right political dichotomy serves liberalism by not challenging it. Democracy sustains the status quo by offering the illusion of choice with no choice. Genuine opposition can only emerge if there is an alternative story with which to counter the current mythos.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Traditionalism-Only-Radicalism-John-Dunn/dp/0992887704/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409426266&sr=8-1&keywords=traditionalism+the+only+radicalism

Sunday, August 03, 2014

Life would be one of rite, rather than flight

Not the self-love and self-interest of Adam Smith’s economic actors 
John Dunn new book. This was authentic sacrifice, the ultimate relinquishment of power, an example to all of how those who live as if before death disempower themselves before hierarchy.

The spiritual and social implications of this example are inseparable, and offer traditionalists a template for social organisation in the future, as they once did in the past. There would, for example, be no amoral economic realm, in which the ‘mundane principles of Judiasm’, as Marx described them, or the self-love and self-interest of Smith’s economic actors, could burgeon again into dominance. An authentic life would be one of obligation and, through submission to the vertical order in a social organism, all roles would be service. As one body, man would reverence being, shepherd being and thereby confront the truth. Life would be one of rite, rather than flight. Our wills would indeed ‘become one single will’ in this respect, in a hierarchy of service to the truth, to the Creator.

No role would escape submission and, in full knowledge of this, the burden of the sacred act of leadership would also be accepted as sacrifice. John Dunn on sacrifice. Recognised as such, and ameliorated by the reverence of others, leadership must also be a sacred act of gnosis, or it will be evil. In other words, the motive of leadership would be sacrifice, rather than the power that defines leadership in the modern world.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Ezra Pound - ‘A nation that will not get itself into debt drives the usurers to fury’

On a unanimous consent voice vote, the 1913 Federal Reserve Act was passed. John Dunn on the Fed. No objection was made, because there was no one there to object.



Anti-climactic this may have been, but the impact of America’s formal assumption into Usura’s empire of central banking was to be devastating and world-changing in the century of world wars ahead. The First World War started almost immediately after the US was securely within the central banking system.



Ezra Pound made the insightful observation that ‘A nation that will not get itself into debt drives the usurers to fury’. And it would indeed appear that the allied powers of Usura (Britain, France and USA) have waged war against countries that have resisted the debt-based financing of central banks, more recently resource-rich Iraq, Libya and Syria. John Dunn book.

World War One started between Austria-Hungary and Serbia, but quickly turned into a war between Usura and Germany. Although pre-war Germany had a private central bank, it was heavily restricted and inflation kept to reasonable levels. Under firm government control, investment was guaranteed to internal economic development, and, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Germany’s economic growth was outstripping those of Britain and France. Put simply, Germany was a threat to Usura’s dominance. 

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, July 11, 2014

The apotheosis of humanism, epitomised in our own time by the all-seeing and information-hungry surveillance state

‘Money destroys human roots’, wrote Simone Weil
Information technology completed the western search for power over being, substituting the idea for being itself and reifying the concept as an entity. John Dunn on surveillance. In this reduction of the world’s diversity to the binary system, the final victory of quantity over quality, that began with money and the usurpation of the cosmic order by the worldly order, we have witnessed the the apotheosis of humanism, epitomised in our own time by the all-seeing and information-hungry surveillance state. Under this regime, there can be no higher good directing our making, moulding and shaping. There can only be the ‘mundane principles’ of liberal humanism and its earthly god - money. Everything, everyone, now conforms with the standard of universal measurement. ‘Money destroys human roots’, wrote Simone Weil, ‘wherever it is able to penetrate, by turning desire for gain into the sole motive. It easily manages to outweigh all other motives, because the effort it demands of the mind is so very much less. Nothing is so clear and so simple as a row of figures’.

We have been taken to the brink. New John Dunn book. There is nowhere left to go, but back. But how will any movement for change be able to get people to think anew, in the manner of the Shepherd? The answer has to lie in the realisation that modern, liberal, humanist rationality does not have any legitimate foundation.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, July 04, 2014

Humanism and liberalism, what Kierkegaard would have described as the apotheosis of defiant despair

Nietzsche's will-to-power
The destruction loosed upon the world by the traffickers of money led to a corrupted understanding of being, which tore men away from their oneness with the world, an integration and an experience that was immediate. New John Dunn book. Truth was once the self-disclosure to man of the things around him. The fact that man represented the revealed truth symbolically did not make the symbols arbitrary acts of the imagination, on the contrary, they remain testament to man’s former openness to truth.

The mystery of the shepherding and symbolising life was shattered by a distanced imposing of ‘truth’ as humanity conceives it, from the minds of men, upon the world. John Dunn on humanism. This humanism gained credence as it developed into the Cartesian dualism of philosophy, science and art - the outlook of the modern world no less.

Humanism and liberalism go hand in hand in their belligerent and totalitarian attitude towards being, making the modern era the culmination of Nietzsche's will-to-power, what Kierkegaard would have described as the apotheosis of defiant despair.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Thursday, July 03, 2014

For only an alliance of the sacred will be able to stand up to the empire of the profane

René Guénon and Frithjof Schuon
Once the central antithesis is understood. Once the disinformation about fighting for freedom, democracy and human rights is cleared away. Once the war for the world is revealed as that which it always was - a war between the forces of good and evil - then can the sides be chosen without ambiguity.

For only an alliance of the sacred will be able to stand up to the empire of the profane. Only a coalition of believers in mankind’s transcendent dimension has a hope of combatting amoral liberalism.

The perennialism and traditionalism of thinkers and writers such as René Guénon, Julius Evola and Frithjof Schuon provide one possible basis for such an alliance. They held that life should be led in the knowledge of values that originate in the transcendent reality that lies outside of human existence, even if that absolute truth was made manifest in different religious forms. They pursued a shared esotericism, regardless of the exoteric expression, be it Muslim, Christian, Judaic, Hindu and more.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

We find two forces in history: one that divides, shatters, and kills, and one that contemplates the unity of the mystery

Ezra Pound
A profound difference between Eliot and Ezra Pound (pictured) was that, whilst sharing the same sense of emptiness and despair about mechanistic and materialistic modernity, Pound was not limited by the exoteric forms of religious belief. John Dunn on Pound. Throughout The Cantos, Pound grappled with the central dichotomy of our times and all times. He represented ‘Usura’ in the imaginative world of The Cantos as ‘the evil, fatal force which stands in diametrical opposition to the energeia or creative, vital force derived from the contemplation of the “unity of the mystery”’. Pound was always transforming the terms of the ‘Usura’/ ‘mysterium’ antithesis, so that the single antithesis developed a polymorphous, proliferating pattern. The protean nature of this antithesis allowed Pound to express its centrality to all aspects of the human condition: mythical, cultural, historical, religious, and economic. New John Dunn publication. In a Visiting Card (1942), Pound described historical events and conditions as products generated through the interaction of the two antithetical forces:
  • We find two forces in history: one that divides, shatters, and kills, and one that contemplates the unity of the mystery....
  • There is the force that falsifies, the force that destroys every delineated symbol, dragging man into a maze of abstract arguments, destroying not one but every religion.
  • But the images of the gods, or Byzantine mosaics, move the soul to contemplation and preserve the tradition of the undivided light.
(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, June 30, 2014

The last vestiges of the traditional order, where money-dealing was condemned and faith was interwoven in the social fabric, had been destroyed by liberalism

T. S. Eliot
In seeking an alternative to liberalism, T. S. Eliot shared Simone Weil’s view that the economic and political must be considered as subordinate to the ‘realm situated... above this world’. New John Dunn book. ‘For myself’, he wrote, ‘a right political philosophy came more and more to imply a right theology – and right economics to depend upon right ethics...’

The last vestiges of the traditional order, where money-dealing was condemned and faith was interwoven in the social fabric, had been destroyed by liberalism to be replaced by commoditisation and the cash relationship. The resultant emptiness, a form of Kierkegaardian despair, is clearly discernible in poems such as the Wasteland and The Hollow Men, and is always in tension with a hunger for meaning and a dormant metaphysical purpose. John Dunn on Eliot. From the early work mentored by Ezra Pound, to the Four Quartets, Eliot illuminated the idea that life is spiritually barren and meaningless without an over-arching quest, sensibility or teleology.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, June 27, 2014

Everything, everyone, now conforms with the standard of universal measurement.

Simone Weil

Nevertheless, the prevailing view in the West is that there is a hierarchy of sorts in the modern democracies, a hierarchy founded on individual merit. John Dunn meritocracy critiqued. This attempt, however, to render equality and difference compatible reflects the ‘political and social confusion’ that Simone Weil (pictured) observed. Meritocracy justifies differences of social status defined quantitatively by wealth, by money, in a world where money makes more money. It also encourages the perversity of individuals who strive to be materially different, whether for honour, reward or survival, which has led to a world of increasing sameness, uniformity and conformity. To apply wealth as the defining factor circumscribes status within the measure of human estimation, to that which is easily calculable. It renders beings uniform, so that there can never be anything singular. Everything, everyone, now conforms with the standard of universal measurement. ‘Money destroys human roots’, exclaimed Weil, ‘wherever it is able to penetrate, by turning desire for gain into the sole motive. New John Dunn book. It easily manages to outweigh all other motives, because the effort it demands of the mind is so very much less. Nothing is so clear and so simple as a row of figures’.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Disorder can only be lived as order for so long


The Worship of Mammon by Evelyn De Morgan, 1909
It is vitally important that we never lose sight of the connection between contemporary liberalism and its inglorious past. John Dunn liberalism critiqued. It was a regressive development, rather than the result of progress as understood by the progressivist ideologues of modernity. Liberalism’s rise was triggered by usury and the trafficking of money, which led western society to take a wrong turn in the sixteenth century. Manipulating the masses through the media and indoctrination (compulsory, curriculum-controlled education), the perpetrators of liberalism are by default the defenders of the money power and worshippers of Mammon.

In short, liberalism does not have a case to make - other than to the supporters and perpetuators of evil. Having established that much, traditionalism can present its own case, having torn the sanctimonious mask from the de-fenders of disorder as order.

Disorder can only be lived as order for so long. Despair may be denied, but a life of inauthenticity will only store up its message of terror for the denier until the point at which no more can be done. New John Dunn book. If at no other time, the dread realisation of a lifetime of inauthenticity and despair will hit the denier at the threshold of death.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, June 23, 2014

An instant sense of proportion imperils financiers

It did not take long after the French Revolution for Louis-Gabriel-Ambrose de Bonald (pictured) to recognise that a devotion to science and the study of material things was complementary to the thriving of commerce. New John Dunn publication. It led, however, to a decline of the mind and reason.
I even believe that a people exclusively devoted to the study of material things - which improve no other faculty than the student’s memory - will eventually become inferior to other peoples with respect to the mind, reason, and other social qualities... Their mercantile commerce will be able to flourish, but their social commerce will be little agreeable.
Bonald recognised the ignorance upon which finance thrived, an ignorance which Ezra Pound later described as antithetic to discrimination by the senses.
Discrimination by the senses is dangerous to avarice. It is dangerous because any perception or any high development of the perceptive facilities may lead to knowledge. The money-changer only thrives on ignorance.
He thrives on all sorts of insensitivity and non-perception. An instant sense of proportion imperils financiers.

You can, by contrast, always get financial backing for debauchery. Any form of “entertainment” that debases perception, anything that profanes the mys-teries or tends to obscure discrimination, goes hand in hand with drives towards money profit.
In such conditions of carefully nurtured mass ignorance, the Usurocracy can depend on democracy as a safe and efficient instrument of dominance and control. Parties critiqued John Dunn. The separate political parties of Usura represent but the separate wings and tendencies of liberalism in what is, in effect, one party rule. Challenges to the money-based power which, given the nature of liberal society, will only ever be from a small minority of enlightened individuals, are thus banished to the margins.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Sunday, June 22, 2014

The poor and the state at the mercy of capital

Emile Keller (1828-1909)
Edmund Burke’s contrasting of the so-called Glorious Revolution with the French Revolution was but a superficial window-dressing of history. John Dunn Whig critique. He and the Whig historians who followed him, simply rendered events acceptable to the Whig collaborators who, on their newly updated and porticoed country estates, were welcoming the money-lenders into their social circles and families. To say the Glorious Revolution was a peaceful handover of power neglected the extended and bloody struggle that led up to it, namely the English Civil War and Dutch Wars. The outcome of the revolutions in Britain and France was certainly the same: financial freedom for the beneficiaries of uncontrolled usury and the fractional reserve lending of central banking.

In contrast to the lickspittle Whig histories, the French counter-revolutionists described the aftermath of financial freedom as anything but glorious. John Dunn new book. Emile Keller’s account, written in 1865, remains just as relevant to this day. ‘The poor and the state itself’, wrote Keller, ‘found themselves at the mercy of capital, which had complete licence to sell, to buy, to speculate, to charge fees, to retain funds, or to lend at high rates’. 



(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Burke - a propagandist in the service of the coup

John Dunn Whigs critiqued. The most earth-shattering revolution the world has ever seen, ultimately with the most violent of consequences for countless millions of its victims to this very day, was described by its propagandists as a victory for moderation.

Whig historians of the so-called Glorious Revolution in Britain have always worked on the basis that if you are going to tell a lie, you might as well make it a big one. Edmund Burke 1729-1797 (pictured), that hero of Anglo-Saxon conservatism, in reality liberalism, set the tone for the historical analysis that continues largely unchanged to this day. He proclaimed that ‘The Revolution was made to preserve our ancient indisputable laws and liberties, and that ancient constitution of government which is our only security for law and liberty’. The English, Burke argued, were not creating a new regime, merely restoring the old one that had been distorted by the Catholic James II. ‘The very idea of the fabrication of a new government is enough to fill us with disgust and horror,’ Burke concluded.


Burke wrote these words in his Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790, just over one hundred years after the usurpation of the British throne by Dutch financiers and their Whig aristocratic collaborators. John Dunn on the coup. He was either oblivious to the significance of this coup d'état, or a propagandist in its service. His work was contrived to give an air of historical legitimacy and continuity to the new banker regime in Britain after 1688, even to the point of fooling avowed French counter-revolutionist and Burke-admirer, Joseph de Maistre 1753-1821. 


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Fending off the forces of Usura

Abraham Lincoln, 16th U.S. President

Assassinated 1865 
Lincoln stood no chance of obtaining war loans at realistic interest rates from the money lenders who wanted the Union to fail. John Dunn new book. The solution to the problem was the ‘green-back’, effectively the resurrection of colonial scrip. Upon taking action to print $450 million worth of greenbacks, Lincoln made this statement of defiance to the forces of Usura intent upon undermining the Union’s cause.

The government should create, issue and circulate all the currency and credit needed to satisfy the spending power of the government and the buying power of consumers... The privilege of creating and issuing money is not only the supreme prerogative of Government, but it is the Government's greatest creative opportunity. By the adoption of these principles, the long-felt want for a uniform medium will be satisfied. The taxpayers will be saved immense sums of interest, discounts and ex-changes. The financing of all public enterprises, the maintenance of stable government and ordered progress, and the conduct of the Treasury will become matters of practical administration. The people can and will be furnished with a currency as safe as their own government. Money will cease to be the master and become the servant of humanity. Democracy will rise superior to the money power.*

It was a defiance for which he would pay dearly shortly after the war ended.

Tsar Alexander II of Russia, who continued to fend off the forces of Usura, blocking their attempts to achieve a foothold in his own country, recognised a potential ally in the Americans if only they could successfully resist the Usurocracy’s efforts to split their country. John Dunn on Civil War. As early as 1861, Russia alerted the Lincoln government to the machinations of Napoleon III, who was already scheming to promote a joint UK-France-Russia intervention in favour of the Confederacy.1 Russia would have no part in this and intervention was avoided because of British and French fears of what Russia might do if they continued to launch bellicose gestures against the Union.

* Quoted in Senate Document 23, National Economy and the Banking System of the United States: An exposition of the principles of modern monetary science in their relation to the national economy and the banking system of the United States, by R. L. Owen, United States, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1939, p.91


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, June 16, 2014

The Usurocracy felt it safe enough to unleash democracy

Thomas Arne wrote the music to match the sentiment
With the seizure of power came the manipulation of the masses. John Dunn mob critique. By 1700, London was the largest city in the world with over 500,000 inhabitants. In the London mob the new money interests ruling England, the Usurocracy, had a ready-made means of securing its grip on power, and it ensured that it could steer the mob in any direction it wanted with the introduction of nationalistic patriotism. After the Act of Union in 1715, the Union Jack became the symbol of this new Whiggism. Thomas Arne wrote the music to match the sentiment. In 1740, theatre audiences were singing along to his Rule Britannia and, by 1745, standing to God Save the King. The mob that had so recently been enslaved to the national debt was induced to to sing, with cruel irony, that ‘Britons never, never, never shall be slaves’. The timing of these instruments of psychological enslavement conditioned minds in readiness for the ‘45 rebellion, a lost cause from the start given its disorganisation, but buoyed along remarkably by popular sentiment for the restoration of the rightful king, particularly in the North, where the instruments of Usura’s propaganda had not yet penetrated. New John Dunn publication. Less than a hundred years later, the Usurocracy felt it safe enough to unleash democracy as its means of securing power against those who could see through its façade of governance to the rottenness of legalised counterfeiting corruption at its core. To this day, the Usurocracy relies on mob rule to maintain and extend its power. It fights wars to extend its grip over the money supply in the name of democracy.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Sunday, June 15, 2014

It all began with money, the trafficking of money and illegal money-lending

It all began with money, the trafficking of money and illegal money-lending by a minority of outsiders who were forced to hide within the very pores of the social organism. John Dunn new book. Usura was born of a long and bitter struggle between the usurer and the rest of mankind. That which was once held to be profane, permitted grudgingly to serve the people in only a limited way, had now usurped power. 



Man had exchanged the God of heaven for the ‘god of the world’, Mammon. John Dunn modernity critiqued. Under no account is historical development in this era to be seen as a progression to a new and enlightened modernity. That would be falling into the trap of believing the victor’s history and philosophy. Man exchanged one belief for another: one based on the vision of attaining as close an alignment as possible to the cosmic order; the other based on money. There is no neutral choice. To view Whig history as though it represented an enlightened rationality is to choose the path of Pharisaic self-righteousness. It is a choice that has had catastrophic consequences for millions upon millions of people since Usura was founded, and continues to do so with increasing ferociousness to this very day.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Dutch financiers from Amsterdam, together with the English Whig collaborators, took control of the British economy

William Patterson 1658 - 1719
John Dunn on the bank. Within six years of deposing the rightful King of England, the Dutch financiers from Amsterdam who had backed the invasion of Britain, nominally under the leadership of William of Orange, together with the English Whig collaborators, sought to exact their return, with interest. They would fulfil their objective of taking control of the British economy, whilst installing themselves as its real governing force. This they did by establishing the Bank of England, the merits of which to its supporters were summed up in the oft-repeated sentence by its nominal founder, William Patterson: ‘the Bank hath benefit of interest on all monies which it creates out of nothing’.

The bank would be enforced as the only source from which government officials could borrow money, with the debt secured against public taxes. New John Dunn book. The country sold bonds to the bank in return for money it could not raise in taxes. The bonds were paid for by money produced from thin air. The government paid interest on the money it borrowed by borrowing more money in the same way. There was no way this debt could ever be paid back. The scam enslaved all who lived under its rule.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

With the King’s defeat all resistance to usury in Britain had come to an end

Oliver Cromwell
After the civil war, Oliver Cromwell permitted the Jews to enter England again, but did not reverse the Edict of Expulsion issued by King Edward I in 1290, which expelled all Jews forever from England and made the provision that any who remained after November 1st 1290, were to be executed.



No other symbolic action could have sent a stronger signal that with the King’s defeat all resistance to usury in Britain had come to an end. It confirmed the beginning of the reign of disorder under the empire of Usura,* with the emergent political and economic creed of Whiggism at its heart.



Concomitant with the Calvinism of the victorious puritans who supported Cromwell was the opening up of the amoral economic sphere where, as Marx observed, life could be led in the ‘spirit’ of Judaism by all. ‘Practical necessity and the pursuit of one’s own advantage’ would rule the day and all political action would be directed towards supporting that end. Hence the sequence of events, in quick succession, that would change the direction of world history and be the source of conflict, death and misery to the present day.

*I have employed Ezra Pound’s collective noun describing the distended western economy with its lopsided foundation upon banking and the principle of ‘interest’. See Pound’s Canto XLV, ‘With Usura’.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The defences of Christendom had been well and truly breached

Into what appears to be a simple effective devotion to the Passion, there was compressed the essence of the practical soteriology of late medieval religion. John Dunn on Pilgrimage. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that the symbol of the Five Wounds should have been chosen by the Pilgrims of Grace as the emblem of their loyalty to the whole medieval Catholic system.*
The religious houses that offered charitable care for the sick and poor were symbolically tending the wounds of Christ. New John Dunn publication. The attack on the monasteries that prompted the Pilgrimage of Grace was therefore an assault on the holistic belief system within which men led their lives. And to what end? Nothing less than mercantilism and commercial gain, the sin of avarice. The defences of Christendom had been well and truly breached. With Joshua-like vehemence, the objectors were swept out of the linear path of progress. Robert Aske the leader of the Pilgrimage was one of 216 martyrs who were brutally hung drawn and quartered or burned to death.

*E. Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England c.1400 - 1580, Yale University Press, 2005, p.248.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, June 09, 2014

The cult of the Five Wounds in England repeatedly expressed itself as acts of charity

John Dunn new book. The link between the sins of mankind and the wounds of Jesus was familiar in sixteenth century England.
It was for this reason that the cult of the Five Wounds in England repeatedly expressed itself as acts of charity as well as Masses and prayers, and especially by acts of charity in multiples of fives, bestowed on Fridays and above all on Good Friday. By such actual and symbolic charity one could turn the wounds of judgement into the Wounds of Mercy, forestalling the condemnation threatened in Matthew 25 by attending, while there was still time, to Christ’s wounded members, the poor.*
Such charity towards the poor was linked intimately with the health of the body of Christ, the church and, therefore, the social organism as a whole. A banner bearing the Holy wounds of Jesus Christ, was carried at the head of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

*E. Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England c.1400 - 1580, Yale University Press, 2005, p.248.

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Sunday, June 08, 2014

Watering the seeds of the individualistic conception of ownership

 
R. H. Tawney wrote about the changing psychology of land ownership

However, a fundamental shift in the psychology of land-ownership went hand-in-hand with the desacralisation of time and space. New John Dunn publication. All notions of obligation to the social organism withered away as quickly as the religious prohibitions on usury began to crumble. This was demonstrated most clearly in the land clearances of the English countryside from the late Middle Ages, due to the expansion of the woollen industry and the economic expediency of replacing people with sheep.
 Taking the typical landowner of the time as his example, Tawney captured the change in mood.
The official opposition to depopulation, which had begun in 1489 and was to last almost until 1640, infuriated him as an intolerable interference with the rights of property. In their attacks on the restraints imposed by village custom below and by the crown from the above, in their illegal defiance of the statutes forbidding depopulation, and in their fierce resistance to the attempts of Wolsey and Somerset to restore the old order, the interests which were making the agrarian revolution were watering the seeds of that individualistic conception of ownership which was to carry all before it after the civil war.
Once the individualistic doctrine was accepted...
...it was to silence the preaching of all social duties save that of submission. John Dunn quotes Tawney. If property be an unconditional right, emphasis on its obligations is little more than the graceful parade of a flattering, but innocuous, metaphor. For, whether the obligations are fulfilled or neglected, the right continues unchallenged and indefeasible,...*
*R.H. Tawney, Religion and the Rise of Capitalism, Pelican, Harmondsworth, 1961, p.152

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, June 07, 2014

Man’s appreciation of the space around him suffered a diminution and homogenisation



Man’s very appreciation of the space around him suffered a similar diminution and homogenisation. John Dunn's new book. In antiquity, as Evola described, every direction corresponded to given influences, out of which, for example, came ‘the doctrine of the sacred orientations in the arrangement of the temples’. This continued into the Christian era in ‘the art of the orientation of the cathedrals that was preserved in Europe up to the Middle Ages’. There were, of course, degrees of sacredness even within the consecrated buildings themselves, which were wholly dependent on spacial arrangements and location.



A sacred geography inspired sacred lands and cities as the centres of spiritual influence on earth; places of pilgrimage, where man could be closer to God. John Dunn on sacredness. The celebrated Mappa Mundi in Hereford Cathedral has Jerusalem at its centre, from which other lands radiate. It was a map of sacred, rather than mere physical geography.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, June 06, 2014

The disorder had been given the philosophical and political legitimacy to be lived as the new order

Medieval buildings in Ghent
The result of this disconnection of man’s will from the divine was that it became increasingly implausible to think politically from the position of the general good. The concept of the general good, as it was understood previously by the medieval mind and prior to that, by the Greeks and Romans, was founded upon the principle of a natural order, a cosmic harmony, and the freedom to do the right thing, which meant hierarchical subordination within the social organism. However, if freedom becomes what the individual determines it to be, then political action can no longer be an assertion of some common understanding of the general good, but has to be, instead, about rights. A very different political life was about to emerge that was founded upon the protection of individual rights. This embryonic individualism takes us back to the new commercial centres, like Ghent, where money had become the new arbiter of power; except that now the deviation from the cosmic order, the disorder, had been given the philosophical and political legitimacy to be lived as the new order.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Thursday, June 05, 2014

Man was left to focus his attention upon the things of this world

Ghent became an important trading centre in the 11th and 12th centuries, thanks to the local production of cloth, made from imported English wool. Next John Dunn publication. The scholastic philosopher known as Henry of Ghent 1217 - 1293 (pictured) was born and lived in the city at this time. He was one of a number of scholastics concerned with the issue philosophers described as univocity, the question of whether one can speak univocally, in the same terms, when describing the attributes of God and man. Henry believed that the divide between God and man was so great that it was impossible to say, for example, that God is good. This was a philosophical development of colossal importance. If one could not say that God is good, that meant that God was absolutely transcendent and man was sitting here on earth by himself. John Dunn on Ghent. This development was not atheism; God was there after all, He created the universe. He may be good or benign, but we cannot say or know for sure. With Henry of Ghent, the world suddenly became very flat. There was a shift from a world that was vertical, where man was a participant in the higher order, to a world that was horizontalised. After all, if you could no longer describe God, if knowledge of God was not accessible to man and the higher order was too transcendent, then one was left to talk about the things of which we have knowledge. Man was left to focus his attention upon the things of this world.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Equality destroys diversity and a right ends up being the right to nothing

The social organism was founded on the principle of unity in multiplicity. John Dunn considers hierarchy. Each thing was considered to be in a relationship with something else in conformity with their respective natures, and thus in conformity with the right to fulfil those natures.

Hierarchy in the social organism was accepted as an extension of the cosmic harmony, without which a reversion the fallen state of man would ensue. Without hierarchy there would be disorder; the realisation of a particular nature would clash with all other natures seeking egotistic fulfilment.

This contrasts with modern thought, in which an individual right is always absolute and therefore excludes all others. Critique by John Dunn of modern thought. Any attempt to give all rights equal validity fails, because equality destroys rights, i.e. the right of a nature to be what it is. Equality is eventually reached on a commodity basis, on the purely quantitative plane of numerical unities (1 = 1), which is only possible through the destruction of all the qualitative differences that make up these diverse natures. Equality destroys diversity and a right ends up being the right to nothing.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

All interest is ‘a vyce moste odyous and detestable'

The Devil of Usury. From John Blaxton's pamphlet against loan sharks, 'The English Usurer', printed by John Norton for Francis Bowman of Oxford, 1634.
By 1571 in England, a mere thirty years after the suppression of the monasteries, the Act of 1552, which had prohibited all interest as ‘a vyce moste odyous and detestable, as in dyvers places of the hollie Scripture it is evident to be seen’, had been swept away. John Dunn on interest. This was but a manifestation of the new paideuma, which held that the world of money and commerce existed in an amoral sphere of their own, separate and apart from religion and ethics.

Religious belief would become increasingly a private affair, whilst the ‘freedom’ of the market reflected the struggle amongst the various possessors of wealth for supremacy. John Dunn publication. Everything would have its price in this blind battle of everyone against everyone. Everything would eventually be bought and sold. Nothing would escape the meshes of this devil’s mill. Gone was the concept of society as a social organism in which everyone had his or her diverse, but equally important part to play. 


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, June 02, 2014

The imposition of civil society and the worship of money worldwide

Medieval society had been characterised by familiarity; people achieved a level of freedom whereby they could do whatever they pleased without fear of violating the norms of the society. New John Dunn publication. After the Reformation, civil society would slowly, but surely, sever all the ties of familiarity, put egoism and selfish need in the place of familial ties, and dissolve the human world into one of atomistic individuals who are inimically opposed to one another. Man’s supreme relation became the legal one. His relation to laws became valid for him not because they were the familiar laws of his own will and nature, but because they were the dominant man-made laws and because departure from them was avenged by the law-makers.

There had once been no division between the inner and personal life of religion and the practical interests of the external order. On civil society John Dunn. After the Reformation all national, natural, moral, and theoretical conditions would become extrinsic to man. Practical need and egoism began to replace salvation as the motivating force of society and, as such, would eventually appear in purest form as soon as civil society had fully given birth to the political states of Western Europe and North America. Undoubtedly, in the new monotheism following the Reformation, money became and remains the god of practical need and self-interest. The rending of the inner life from the external material world continues to this day, as the dominant economies with their liberal ideology, have countenanced no resistance to the imposition of civil society and the worship of money worldwide.



(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Sunday, June 01, 2014

The gristly roots of ideas that are in action

Leo Frobenius
The aptitudes cultivated by a life devoted to business found their complement in the new theology, which formed the basis of a new paideuma, a term coined by Leo Frobenius and described by Ezra Pound as meaning ‘the tangle or complex of the inrooted ideas of any period. . . , the gristly roots of ideas that are in action’. John Dunn quotes Pound. In this Reformation paideuma of the Calvinists, the will of God was allied with the economic virtues that had escaped the clutches of the restrictive traditional belief system of the medieval Roman church. The escapees and inverters of the values of tradition from this point would see all forms of traditional belief as barriers in the path of progress; and it would be a linear path into the future, in keeping with Judaic tradition. Calvin’s emphasis on Sola Scriptura, meaning the Scriptures as a unique revelation of the way to life, threw a much greater emphasis upon the Old Testament for the individual Christian than under the Roman Catholic tradition. With the stories from the Hebrew Bible as their example, all opposition from tradition along the path ahead would be dealt with as ruthlessly as Joshua dealt with Jericho etc. In their determination to clear the pathway ahead, the adherents of the new paideuma would use every weapon at their disposal, including subterfuge, political revolution and war, because the issue at stake was not perceived to be merely economic self-interest, but now the will of God, later to be the will of the people. New John Dunn book. Society would now consist of the elect and unelect, winners and losers, the chosen and the rest, in a civil society that grew out of Calvin’s covenantal, or contractual, view of church and society as voluntary associations.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Calvin and his followers assumed credit to be a normal fact of life


Under the new and progressive urban conditions, the rules were turned upon their head. John Dunn on rising modernity. Whereas to strive for personal enrichment had once seemed incomprehensible, for the Calvinist there was nothing wrong with good honest profit, as he understood it, derived from diligence and industry. Usury became respectable, where it has previously been condemned as immoral. Calvin and his followers assumed credit to be a normal fact of life; and the financier was not a pariah, but a useful member of society.

Luther believed that anyone could reach salvation as long as he had faith. Calvinism examined by John Dunn. This belief is expressed in his famous statement ‘justification by faith’, wherein one did not have to be chosen to have faith. In contrast, Calvin preached that those predestined for salvation were defined by their virtuous lives, and they were referred to as ‘the elect’. Also, the elect could be determined by their economic and material success. Under this doctrine, good works, whilst not a way of attaining salvation, become indispensable as a proof that salvation has been attained


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, May 30, 2014

The middle-man as a parasite and the usurer as a thief

A selection of medieval buildings in Ghent
The medieval church had striven to keep the uses of money limited and under strict control, with usury in the most widely defined sense outlawed as an excommunicable offence. John Dunn money critique. Society was conceived holistically as a people of God, which reflected St Paul’s metaphor of the Church as the body of Christ. In this social organism the parts, though varied, each served vital functions for the survival of the whole. Disproportionate growth of any one part, such as trade for monetary gain, was seen as a malignant threat to the rest, quite apart from the biblical admonishment of usury as sinful.

Calvinism, an urban movement, found its stronghold in social groups to which the traditional scheme of social ethics had become irrelevant. Emergent John Dunn money centres. Its most influential adherents operated in the great business centres like Antwerp and Ghent with their industrial hinterland, London and Amsterdam, strongly influenced by generations of Jewish emigres whose antecedents had been ousted from Spain, France and England. For any reformed theology to thrive in these conditions, it had to start from a frank recognition of the necessity of capital, credit and banking; and that is just what Calvinism did, breaking with the tradition that regarded a preoccupation with economic interests beyond subsistence needs as sinful, which stigmatised the middle-man as a parasite and the usurer as a thief.



(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Imagine the despair of the faithful when the Pope himself resorted to financial chicanery

Jacob Fugger ("The Rich") of Augsburg (1459 - 1525)



‘The Catholic Church went out of business when its hierarchy ceased to believe its own dogma. Leo X didn’t take Luther’s thought as a serious matter. He didn’t expect others to do so.’ John Dunn considers Luther. So wrote Ezra Pound on the Reformation. If the misuse of money was seen by the medieval church as the major threat to the social unity of Christendom, imagine the despair of the faithful when the Pope himself resorted to financial chicanery to finance the renovation of St Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

The banker known as Jakob Fugger the Rich was chosen by Pope Leo X to manage the money-raising campaign. Johanne Tetzel, a Dominican priest, began the sale of indulgences across the German lands. In particular, Albert, the Archbishop of Maintz, agreed to allow the sale of the indulgences in his territory in exchange for a cut of the proceeds. New John Dunn publication. He did so in order to pay off the debts he had incurred in paying for his high church rank.

Despairing of the money corruption and usury-driven indulgences, Martin Luther famously nailed his ninety five theses to the door of Wittenberg cathedral in 1517. Within two weeks, copies of the Theses had spread throughout Germany; within two months throughout Europe.



(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Stand and do battle against Belial’s children

“Never has Hell received a more dissolute, more heinous, more worthless spirit, or one more in love with vice for vice´s sake!” The demon thus characterized by a medieval writer is Belial, the demon of lies… He is said to have been created immediately after Lucifer himself,and was one of the first angels to revolt against God. This is why he was expelled from heaven. Among certain sects of the Jews, Belial was considered the chief of all the devils.
William Langland wrote, ‘He called that house Unity - which is Holy Church in English’. John Dunn reads Langland. Yet no one was more aware than Langland of the crumbling Christian edifice. The whole of Piers the Ploughman is an impassioned plea for social and religious reform, so much so that he has sometimes been regarded as a harbinger of the Protestant Reformation. But his emphasis was always on a forlorn call to unity: ‘Call we to all the Commons that they come into Unity’ ‘and there stand and do battle against Belial’s children.’

Until Langland’s time, markets had played only a subordinate, local role hemmed in by the limited economic boundaries of the feudal world. Human beings, land and money were not subject to the laws of the market. Non-economic norms set by the political and religious hierarchies regulated human labour and the ownership of land, neither of which were commercially transferable. John Dunn on money. ‘Belial’s children’ however, would not be held at bay. Though trafficking in money was notionally blocked by the religious prohibition of usury, it continued to be carried out in increasing volumes by those excluded from feudal society, forced to live on its margins or in its pores. The money germ would not be dislodged. Eventually it would eat away Christendom.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com