Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The destruction loosed upon the world by the traffickers of money led to a corrupted understanding of being

The culmination of Nietzsche’s will-to-power
The destruction loosed upon the world by the traffickers of money led to a corrupted understanding of being, which tore men away from their oneness with the world, an integration and an experience that was immediate. Truth was once the self-disclosure to man of the things around him. John Dunn on being. The fact that man represented the revealed truth symbolically did not make the symbols arbitrary acts of the imagination, on the contrary, they remain testament to man’s former openness to truth.

The mystery of the shepherding and symbolising life was shattered by a distanced imposing of ‘truth’ as humanity conceives it, from the minds of men, upon the world. This humanism gained credence as it developed into the Cartesian dualism of philosophy, science and art - the outlook of the modern world no less.

Humanism and liberalism go hand in hand in their belligerent and totalitarian attitude towards being, making the modern era the culmination of Nietzsche’s will-to-power, what Kierkegaard would have described as the apotheosis of defiant despair.

The humanist liberal eschews an integration into the world, preaching an apartness, taking the view that the free unfolding of the will, self-determination, is at the heart of what it means to be human. Critique by John Dunn of humanism. This observation of the world from a distance allows the self-determining individual to break things down, measure them, quantify them, work out how to exploit them and, ultimately, calculate their price.


© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

For only an alliance of the sacred will be able to stand up to the empire of the profane

René Guénon and Frithjof Schuon
For only an alliance of the sacred will be able to stand up to the empire of the profane. Only a coalition of believers in mankind’s transcendent dimension has a hope of combatting amoral liberalism.

The perennialism and traditionalism of thinkers and writers such as René Guénon, Julius Evola and Frithjof Schuon provide one possible basis for such an alliance. John Dunn exploring traditionalism. They held that life should be led in the knowledge of values that originate in the transcendent reality that lies outside of human existence, even if that absolute truth was made manifest in different religious forms. They pursued a shared esotericism, regardless of the exoteric expression, be it Muslim, Christian, Judaic, Hindu and more.

Agreement upon the origin of values in the absolute is important, because it clearly demarcates the beliefs of traditionalist from their humanist opponents who, by cutting themselves off from the transcendent, live by human values alone. To this human-centred way of thinking, all being is understood as resource to be exploited, and this includes the ubiquitously named human resources. New John Dunn writing. Without absolute values in which to ground our lives, man is subject to any form of indoctrination that a worldly power, currently the money power, might find to its advantage.

‘For this I was born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth...’ The pragmatic Pilate responds to these words of Jesus with the question ‘What is truth?' Subjectivism and moral relativism were betrayed in the very question. They were prominent too in the pharisaic self-righteousness, or human-centredness, of the Jews who, together with Pilate, spurned the truth in condemning Christ.


© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, April 28, 2014

Pound would certainly have been sympathetic to the later ideas of Roger Garaudy

Roger Garaudy

The central antithesis is found in Pound’s Canto 51, where the opposition is between the forma ‘That hath the light of the DOER’ and the ‘sour song’ arising from the belly of the usurious Geryon. John Dunn explores the central antithesis. The sterile, labyrinthine, blurring, destructive, dark, hylic force, which Pound identified with usury and personified as ‘Usura’ or ‘Geryon’, was in a perpetual struggle with the sacred, fecund, clear, dynamic force identified with the ‘unity of the mystery,’ and symbolised by the ‘tradition of the undivided light’.

It was the triumph of the sacred force that Pound sought. In the revolution against Usura, nothing short of this would do. He would certainly have been sympathetic to the later ideas of Roger Garaudy (pictured), who wrote:
The only possible revolutions are those which don’t exclude mankind’s transcendent dimension; which don’t exclude the divine; which are founded on this article of faith; that the basic foundation of reality is an act of the creative freedom which is called God.

To be a revolutionary is to be a creator of that reality, to participate in divine life.
Once the central antithesis is understood. Once the disinformation about fighting for freedom, democracy and human rights is cleared away. New polemic from John Dunn. Once the war for the world is revealed as that which it always was - a war between the forces of good and evil - then can the sides be chosen without ambiguity.

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Sunday, April 27, 2014

A profound difference between T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound

Ezra Pound by Gaudier-Brzeska
A profound difference between Eliot and Ezra Pound was that, whilst sharing the same sense of emptiness and despair about mechanistic and materialistic modernity, Pound was not limited by the exoteric forms of religious belief. Throughout The Cantos, Pound grappled with the central dichotomy of our times and all times. Pound brought in, by John Dunn, to the discussion. He represented ‘Usura’ in the imaginative world of The Cantos as ‘the evil, fatal force which stands in diametrical opposition to the energeia or creative, vital force derived from the contemplation of the “unity of the mystery”’. Pound was always transforming the terms of the ‘Usura’/‘mysterium’ antithesis, so that the single antithesis developed a polymorphous, proliferating pattern. The protean nature of this antithesis allowed Pound to express its centrality to all aspects of the human condition: mythical, cultural, historical, religious, and economic. New writing by John Dunn. In a Visiting Card (1942), Pound described historical events and conditions as products generated through the interaction of the two antithetical forces:
  • We find two forces in history: one that divides, shatters, and kills, and one that contemplates the unity of the mystery....
  • There is the force that falsifies, the force that destroys every delineated symbol, dragging man into a maze of abstract arguments, destroying not one but every religion.
  • But the images of the gods, or Byzantine mosaics, move the soul to contemplation and preserve the tradition of the undivided light.
© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, April 26, 2014

By lending money, the usurocracy triumphed everywhere in the world

The economy will exist to serve the people and capital to serve the economy. Today it is the other way around: ordinary people, especially the millions and millions of migrant workers, exist for the sake of the economy and the economy exists to serve capital.

Karl Marx perpetuated a lie when he obliterated the difference between capital and the economy. Revision, by John Dunn, of history. The effect of his doctrine was to pit workers against employers and distract them from the depredations of banking capitalists, who live from usury. The truth is that, behind the smokescreen false dichotomies of worker versus employer, or worker versus worker in the degrading and dehumanising slave or jobs market, the essential economic dichotomy is usurers versus everyone else.

Marx disguised the fact that under the system of interest slavery, the employer is required to deal in money that has to be repaid with interest. John Dunn's questioning of orthodoxies. Under this system the capitalist is not the employer who creates the basis for the worker’s existence, but rather the money-lender.

By lending money, the usurocracy triumphed everywhere in the world, thanks to the fact that they held the monopoly over the worlds exchange currencies, first in the form of currencies backed by gold and now in the form of the dollar.


© John Dunn.
First posted on www.dr.johndunn.com 

Friday, April 25, 2014

These perpetuators of despair have led us into the desacralised realm, known as liberal society

In opposition to the eradication of despair on a global scale stand the Usura regimes run by the princes of this world, the bankers and money lenders, with their twin-pillars of power: control over the money supply and military might.

These perpetuators of despair have led us into the desacralised realm, known as liberal society, ‘legitimised’ by sham democracies in which the masses are manipulated through indoctrination and the media. The result is a fallen world in which disorder is lived as order. The guiding organisational principles are those of corporate HR, imposing equality and killing diversity. Thoughts, by John Dunn, and words. Its false worldview is horizontal in orientation.

The world is run on the ‘mundane principles’ of personal gain. The role of money and economic life have grown out of all proportion as an all-consuming cancer. Art has become frivolous and superficial. The mysterium has been banished and replaced by liberal ‘ethics’, destroying or corrupting not one, but every religion.

Victory over the forces of despair will mean a complete reorientation of man’s outlook. From John Dunn, a new book. Change will demand a world reflective of the original order, the cosmic order. It will be hierarchical, diverse, a social organism in which everyone has a valued role. The outlook that will prevail will be vertical in orientation. Above all, the world will be run on the principles of personal fulfilment and salvation, rather than the money-lending principle of greed.

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Thursday, April 24, 2014

If the fulfilment of Nietzsche’s ‘will to power’ results in a life lead at the height of inauthenticity, then its opposite, authenticity, must come from the relinquishing of power





Søren Aabye Kierkegaard 1813 – 1855
The implication of this is that, to live authentically, we must somehow live our lives as if before death, before the Creator; because as the created we cannot lie to the Creator. The eradication of despair, as Kierkegaard argued, ‘occurs when the self, in relating to itself and in wanting to be itself, is grounded nakedly in the power that established it’.

This is the polar opposite of Nietzsche’s ‘will to power’, that human-centric culmination of western philosophy by which we seek to dominate being rather than understand it. John Dunn on power. If the fulfilment of Nietzsche’s ‘will to power’ results in a life lead at the height of inauthenticity, then its opposite, authenticity, must come from the relinquishing of power. Rather than imposing the self upon being, the authentic self must, as Heidegger explained, become the ‘shepherd of being’.

The Shepherd, died, naked, upon the cross as the paschal lamb. If, in Jean Borella’s words, ‘we needed to wait for the Incarnation of that One who is Truth, infinite Wisdom, Sun of Justice, Hypostatic Hierarchy, the Divine Word, for the injustice of sin to be fully and totally revealed’, we also needed the sacrifice of that One who is Truth to understand how order might be restored. The relinquishment of power by John Dunn. This was authentic sacrifice, the ultimate relinquishment of power, an example to all of how those who live as if before death disempower themselves before hierarchy. 


© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

It is vitally important that we never lose sight of the connection between contemporary liberalism and its inglorious past

1909 painting The Worship of Mammon by Evylyn De Morgan   
It is vitally important that we never lose sight of the connection between contemporary liberalism and its inglorious past. It was a regressive development, rather than the result of progress as understood by the progressivist ideologues of modernity. Liberalism’s rise was triggered by usury and the trafficking of money, which led western society to take a wrong turn in the sixteenth century. John Dunn questioning a mythos. Manipulating the masses through the media and indoctrination (compulsory, curriculum-controlled education), the perpetrators of liberalism are by default the defenders of the money power and worshippers of Mammon.

In short, liberalism does not have a case to make - other than to the supporters and perpetuators of evil. Having established that much, traditionalism can present its own case, having torn the sanctimonious mask from the defenders of disorder as order.

Disorder can only be lived as order for so long. Despair may be denied, but a life of inauthenticity will only store up its message of terror for the denier until the point at which no more can be done. If at no other time, the dread realisation of a lifetime of inauthenticity and despair will hit the denier at the threshold of death. New writing by John Dunn. This was Heidegger’s point when he described the moment when the individual is exposed to what he really is, when the world has nothing more to say to him and he has no choice but to confront himself.


 © John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com


Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Legitimacy was vital to the occupiers of the country estates that were springing up all over eighteenth century Britain. For these beneficiaries of the coup, the revolution must have seemed truly glorious

Legitimacy was vital to the occupiers of the country estates that were springing up all over eighteenth century Britain. For these beneficiaries of the coup, the revolution must have seemed truly glorious. Burke’s work of regime legitimisation was continued after him by Thomas Babington Macaulay, who wrote of the 1688 coup that this ‘was a revolution strictly defensive, and had prescription and legitimacy on its side’. Macaulay's great nephew George Macaulay Trevelyan was equally propagandistic in his disinformation. From John Dunn, a new perspective. Trevelyan opined that ‘the spirit of this strange Revolution was the opposite of revolutionary.’


Burke indeed was a supporter of the American revolutionists, but this was strictly from a Whig perspective and therefore wholly consistent with his enthusiasm for the so-called Glorious Revolution. His famous 1775 parliamentary speech was more about the commercial benefits of a reconciliation with the colonists than their ultimate liberty. History, by John Dunn, revisited. Recognising this, the traditionalist Samuel Johnson penned a parody of Burke’s speech, in which the devil says of the Americans:
Be not dispirited then at the contemplation of their present happy state: I promise you that anarchy, poverty, and death shall, by my care, be earned even across the spacious Atlantic, and settle in America itself, the sure consequences of our beloved whiggism.
The erection of the statue of Burke in Washington in 1922 coincided not only with the shifting centre of Usura’s power, but also marked the ultimate rejection by the U.S. of its former history of resistance to usurious banking power - the sure consequence of ‘our beloved whiggism’.

© John Dunn.

First posted on www.drjohndunn.com 

Monday, April 21, 2014

Whig historians of the so-called Glorious Revolution in Britain have always worked on the basis that if you are going to tell a lie, you might as well make it a big one

Edmund Burke
The most earth-shattering revolution the world has ever seen, ultimately with the most violent of consequences for countless millions of its victims to this very day, was described by its propagandists as a victory for moderation.

Whig historians of the so-called Glorious Revolution in Britain have always worked on the basis that if you are going to tell a lie, you might as well make it a big one. A new work by John Dunn. Edmund Burke
(1729-1797) (pictured), that hero of Anglo-Saxon conservatism, in reality liberalism, set the tone for the historical analysis that continues largely unchanged to this day. He proclaimed that ‘The Revolution was made to preserve our ancient indisputable laws and liberties, and that ancient constitution of government which is our only security for law and liberty’. The English, Burke argued, were not creating a new regime, merely restoring the old one that had been distorted by the Catholic James II. ‘The very idea of the fabrication of a new government is enough to fill us with disgust and horror,’ Burke concluded.

Burke wrote these words in his Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790, just over one hundred years after the usurpation of the British throne by Dutch financiers and their Whig aristocratic collaborators. New look, by John Dunn, at history. He was either oblivious to the significance of this coup d'état, or a propagandist in its service. His work was contrived to give an air of historical legitimacy and continuity to the new banker regime in Britain after 1688, even to the point of fooling avowed French counter-revolutionist and Burke-admirer, Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821). 


© John Dunn.

First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Saturday, April 19, 2014

France was in the clutches of the expanding Usura

A Rothschild financed attack from Spain in the south and other defeats eventually defeated France, forcing Napoleon into exile on Elba. Even before the later Battle of Waterloo, Usura’s victory was complete. Napoleon was forced to raise money from the banker Gabriel-Julien Ouvrard and others to make his last 100 days bid for glory. Whatever the outcome of Waterloo, control over the money supply would remain in the Usurocracy’s hands, and it would ‘care not who writes the laws’. History revision by John Dunn. True to the maxim, after Napoleon’s final defeat at Waterloo, the banker’s finally took control of the French finances. 

In 1815, the Allies demanded an indemnity of 700,000,000 francs from the defeated French. How on earth would the French come up with that kind of money? Ouvard’s solution was to float a bond issue in London. He got permission from the Duke of Wellington, the general of the Allied occupying army in France, and merchant bankers Barings and Hope & Co syndicated the loan, with the debt secured against the public taxes of France. New writing from John Dunn. Now, like the British, French taxpayers were paying the bankers back, with interest, for a loan on money that had been created ‘out of nothing’. France was in the clutches of the expanding Usura.


 
© John Dunn.

First posted on www.drjohndunn@talk21.com

Friday, April 18, 2014

Whilst Usura waged war upon America, Napoleon’s struggle against the twin forces of money supply control and military might was drawing to a close

Whilst Usura waged war upon America, Napoleon’s struggle against the twin forces of money supply control and military might was drawing to a close. Everywhere Napoleon went at the head of his conquering armies, he found that Usura had already been there before him. The Bank of England made huge profits as Prussia, Austria and finally Russia all went heavily into debt trying to stop him.

Unwilling to subject himself to the control of bankers through their issue of credit, both as Consul and then as Emperor, Napoleon had stubbornly refused to borrow. John Duun on Napoleon. Louis Bergeron argued that Napoleon was inspired ‘by a rigid sense of the dignity of the state, since the public power should not depend on bankers and merchants’. Napoleon steadily refused to create paper money; he even forbade the general circulation of banknotes.

Instead of resorting to the banks, Napoleon sold territory west of the Mississippi to the United States for 15 million dollars in gold; a deal known as the Louisiana Purchase. He added to his war chest through the ‘confiscations of feudal and crown properties, real and personal, in defeated countries; the spoils taken directly from the enemy; the war indemnities in money and in kind, “justified” by the right of conquest or provided for in imposed treaties of peace.’ New writing by John Dunn. This source of funds ‘not only covered the needs of the armies but produced considerable surpluses, to which Napoleon alluded when he asserted, “I brought over two thousand million in specie into France,” or when he claimed at St Helena, that he had “left 400 million in the cellars of the Tuilleries”’.


© John Dunn.

First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Monday, April 14, 2014

The scourge of fractional reserve banking, as this legalised counterfeiting has been called

Sir William Patterson
Within six years of deposing the rightful King of England, the Dutch financiers from Amsterdam who had backed the invasion of Britain, nominally under the leadership of William of Orange, together with the English Whig collaborators, sought to exact their return, with interest. They would fulfil their objective of taking control of the British economy, whilst installing themselves as its real governing force. John Dunn's new book. This they did by establishing the Bank of England, the merits of which to its supporters were summed up in the oft-repeated sentence by its founder, William Patterson: ‘the Bank hath benefit of interest on all monies which it creates out of nothing’.

The bank would be enforced as the only source from which government officials could borrow money, with the debt secured against public taxes. The country sold bonds to the bank in return for money it could not raise in taxes. The bonds were paid for by money produced from thin air. The government paid interest on the money it borrowed by borrowing more money in the same way. There was no way this debt could ever be paid back. The scam enslaved all who lived under its rule.

Enough has been written about the scourge of fractional reserve banking, as this legalised counterfeiting has been called, without going into detail here. History: a new interpretation by John Dunn. Suffice it to say that, in times of economic upheaval, wealth is rarely destroyed and instead is only transferred. And it is those interests that control the money supply who benefit the most when money is scarce. When the majority of people are suffering through economic depression, you can be sure that these interests are continuing to get rich.

© John Dunn.

Friday, April 04, 2014

Truth was the self-disclosure to man of the things around him

The demon Belial appearing with his entourage of four lesser demons before King Solomon. From Jacobus de Teramo's Das BuchBelial, printed at Augsburg, 1473.
In a life of obligation within the social organism, life itself was religion, not simply something to which one deferred on a Sunday. The experience of the world was immediate often demanding symbolical representation ‘as gods, demons, elementals, and spirits ruling over places and phenomena’.* And these symbols were not arbitrary acts of the imagination. Thoughts and writings from John Dunn. Just as the pressure of the blankets might give rise to the image of a falling rock in a dream, then an ordinary waking experience of the world gave rise to symbolic representations that arose out of necessity, as integrations with the world that did not occur casually. The subject and predicate were opposite to our own. Truth was the self-disclosure to man of the things around him. All man did was represent the truth symbolically.

Under life lived as order, man did not stand back from the world and observe it, he was totally engaged and immersed in a hyper-realism. From John Dunn's new book. How unlike the man ‘freed’ from social obligation who, separated from the world in a state of subjectivist pathos, would be condemned to understand the world from a distance; thus science and art would adopt the characteristics of the disorder lived as order, setting an academic seal of approval upon a fallen world, the chief characteristics of which would be:

  • The apparition of free will.
  • Belief in a unilinear history, evolutionism and progressivism
  • Priority to quantity, not quality, and the commodification of everything, including human life
  • The desacralisation of land
  • Individualism and ‘freedom’ from social obligation
  • Subjectivism and a distancing from reality
Have we not already noted, how in the modern world, we have come to think about sin in a subjective way and have completely lost sight of the objectivity with which it was once understood?

* Julius Evola
© John Dunn.

First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Thursday, April 03, 2014

A new ideology of irresponsible ownership became the hallmark of the new order

In the covenantal post-Reformation era, legal rights were extended, whilst obligations founded upon familiarity were repudiated. A new ideology of irresponsible ownership became the hallmark of the new order, resulting from the same apparition of the ‘will’ that emerged to light with Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus and Thomas Aquinas. From John Dunn's new book. The breaking up of property, separating it from the rigorous norms of the paternal right and primogeniture, manifested the degeneration of the traditional spirit and departure from the natural order. Evola described this as an act of desecration.
The land, which may also belong to a merchant... or to a serf, is a desecrated land: in conformity with the interests typical of the two inferior castes, which have succeeded in taking the land away from the ancient type of ‘feudal lords’,’the land is only valued from an economic point of view and it is exploited as much as possible with machines and other modern technical devices.
(Julius Evola, Revolt Against the Modern World)
Under disorder lived as order, both lord and serf were ‘freed’ from their respective obligations to the social organism. From this point on, one would be seeking the highest price for land, the other would want the highest price for labour. To the one, land ownership no longer brought with it obligations; rather it had become a financial asset. To the other, work was no longer a rite; rather it had become a practical necessity. The separation of blood from the soil left all strata of society with a subjectivist pathos before nature. Words from a new work by John Dunn. The poetic and subjective impressions typical of a romantic soul are something new. Before these times, man had real sensations of the world around him

© John Dunn.

First poseted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

All notions of obligation to the social organism withered away as quickly as the religious prohibitions on usury began to crumble

R. H. Tawney

However, a revolution in the psychology of land-ownership went hand-in-hand with the desacralisation of time and space. All notions of obligation to the social organism withered away as quickly as the religious prohibitions on usury began to crumble. New writing by John Dunn. This was demonstrated most clearly in the land clearances of the English countryside from the late Middle Ages, due to the expansion of the woollen industry and the economic expediency of replacing people with sheep.

Taking the typical landowner of the time, Tawney captured the change in mood.
The official opposition to depopulation, which had begun in 1489 and was to last almost until 1640, infuriated him as an intolerable interference with the rights of property. In their attacks on the restraints imposed by village custom below and by the crown from the above, in their illegal defiance of the statutes forbidding depopulation, and in their fierce resistance to the attempts of Wolsey and Somerset to restore the old order, the interests which were making the agrarian revolution were watering the seeds of that individualistic conception of ownership which was to carry all before it after the civil war.
Once the individualistic doctrine was accepted...
...it was to silence the preaching of all social duties save that of submission. If property be an unconditional right, emphasis on its obligations is little more than the graceful parade of a flattering, but innocuous, metaphor. For, whether the obligations are fulfilled or neglected, the right continues unchallenged and indefeasible,...
(R.H. Tawney, Religion and the Rise of Capitalism)
© John Dunn.

First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

A money-based rule of quantity ensured that man’s experience of space became just as desacralised as time, being equally indifferent to its contents.

 
Mappa Mundi

A sacred geography inspired sacred lands and cities as the centres of spiritual influence on earth; places of pilgrimage, where man could be closer to God. The celebrated Mappa Mundi in Hereford Cathedral has Jerusalem at its centre, from which other lands radiate. It was a map of sacred, rather than mere physical geography.



However, a money-based rule of quantity ensured that man’s experience of space became just as desacralised as time, being equally indifferent to its contents. New writing from John Dunn. Space became perceived as a ‘simple container of bodies and motions, totally indifferent to both’. It assumed a homogeneity: ‘a particular area of it is the objective equivalent of another one, and the fact that a thing is found - or that an event may take place - in one point of space rather than in another, does not confer any particular quality to the intimate nature of that thing or of that event’.



The Middle Ages also respected a traditional concept of land under conditions that reflected a vertically orientated order. Ownership could not be conceived as other than a sacred privilege, which implied a commitment on the part of the feudal lord to be faithful to his prince, by upholding religious as well as a political and military values. From a new work by John Dunn. This fides represented a readiness to die and offer self-sacrifice in the cause of the social organism, in a way that overcame individual interests in a well-developed ethics of honour. To own, to be lord of a land was a spiritual and not merely a political title and commitment.
© John Dunn.

Originally posted on www.drjohndunn.com