Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Ezra Pound - ‘A nation that will not get itself into debt drives the usurers to fury’

On a unanimous consent voice vote, the 1913 Federal Reserve Act was passed. John Dunn on the Fed. No objection was made, because there was no one there to object.



Anti-climactic this may have been, but the impact of America’s formal assumption into Usura’s empire of central banking was to be devastating and world-changing in the century of world wars ahead. The First World War started almost immediately after the US was securely within the central banking system.



Ezra Pound made the insightful observation that ‘A nation that will not get itself into debt drives the usurers to fury’. And it would indeed appear that the allied powers of Usura (Britain, France and USA) have waged war against countries that have resisted the debt-based financing of central banks, more recently resource-rich Iraq, Libya and Syria. John Dunn book.

World War One started between Austria-Hungary and Serbia, but quickly turned into a war between Usura and Germany. Although pre-war Germany had a private central bank, it was heavily restricted and inflation kept to reasonable levels. Under firm government control, investment was guaranteed to internal economic development, and, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Germany’s economic growth was outstripping those of Britain and France. Put simply, Germany was a threat to Usura’s dominance. 

(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, July 11, 2014

The apotheosis of humanism, epitomised in our own time by the all-seeing and information-hungry surveillance state

‘Money destroys human roots’, wrote Simone Weil
Information technology completed the western search for power over being, substituting the idea for being itself and reifying the concept as an entity. John Dunn on surveillance. In this reduction of the world’s diversity to the binary system, the final victory of quantity over quality, that began with money and the usurpation of the cosmic order by the worldly order, we have witnessed the the apotheosis of humanism, epitomised in our own time by the all-seeing and information-hungry surveillance state. Under this regime, there can be no higher good directing our making, moulding and shaping. There can only be the ‘mundane principles’ of liberal humanism and its earthly god - money. Everything, everyone, now conforms with the standard of universal measurement. ‘Money destroys human roots’, wrote Simone Weil, ‘wherever it is able to penetrate, by turning desire for gain into the sole motive. It easily manages to outweigh all other motives, because the effort it demands of the mind is so very much less. Nothing is so clear and so simple as a row of figures’.

We have been taken to the brink. New John Dunn book. There is nowhere left to go, but back. But how will any movement for change be able to get people to think anew, in the manner of the Shepherd? The answer has to lie in the realisation that modern, liberal, humanist rationality does not have any legitimate foundation.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Friday, July 04, 2014

Humanism and liberalism, what Kierkegaard would have described as the apotheosis of defiant despair

Nietzsche's will-to-power
The destruction loosed upon the world by the traffickers of money led to a corrupted understanding of being, which tore men away from their oneness with the world, an integration and an experience that was immediate. New John Dunn book. Truth was once the self-disclosure to man of the things around him. The fact that man represented the revealed truth symbolically did not make the symbols arbitrary acts of the imagination, on the contrary, they remain testament to man’s former openness to truth.

The mystery of the shepherding and symbolising life was shattered by a distanced imposing of ‘truth’ as humanity conceives it, from the minds of men, upon the world. John Dunn on humanism. This humanism gained credence as it developed into the Cartesian dualism of philosophy, science and art - the outlook of the modern world no less.

Humanism and liberalism go hand in hand in their belligerent and totalitarian attitude towards being, making the modern era the culmination of Nietzsche's will-to-power, what Kierkegaard would have described as the apotheosis of defiant despair.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Thursday, July 03, 2014

For only an alliance of the sacred will be able to stand up to the empire of the profane

René Guénon and Frithjof Schuon
Once the central antithesis is understood. Once the disinformation about fighting for freedom, democracy and human rights is cleared away. Once the war for the world is revealed as that which it always was - a war between the forces of good and evil - then can the sides be chosen without ambiguity.

For only an alliance of the sacred will be able to stand up to the empire of the profane. Only a coalition of believers in mankind’s transcendent dimension has a hope of combatting amoral liberalism.

The perennialism and traditionalism of thinkers and writers such as René Guénon, Julius Evola and Frithjof Schuon provide one possible basis for such an alliance. They held that life should be led in the knowledge of values that originate in the transcendent reality that lies outside of human existence, even if that absolute truth was made manifest in different religious forms. They pursued a shared esotericism, regardless of the exoteric expression, be it Muslim, Christian, Judaic, Hindu and more.


(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

We find two forces in history: one that divides, shatters, and kills, and one that contemplates the unity of the mystery

Ezra Pound
A profound difference between Eliot and Ezra Pound (pictured) was that, whilst sharing the same sense of emptiness and despair about mechanistic and materialistic modernity, Pound was not limited by the exoteric forms of religious belief. John Dunn on Pound. Throughout The Cantos, Pound grappled with the central dichotomy of our times and all times. He represented ‘Usura’ in the imaginative world of The Cantos as ‘the evil, fatal force which stands in diametrical opposition to the energeia or creative, vital force derived from the contemplation of the “unity of the mystery”’. Pound was always transforming the terms of the ‘Usura’/ ‘mysterium’ antithesis, so that the single antithesis developed a polymorphous, proliferating pattern. The protean nature of this antithesis allowed Pound to express its centrality to all aspects of the human condition: mythical, cultural, historical, religious, and economic. New John Dunn publication. In a Visiting Card (1942), Pound described historical events and conditions as products generated through the interaction of the two antithetical forces:
  • We find two forces in history: one that divides, shatters, and kills, and one that contemplates the unity of the mystery....
  • There is the force that falsifies, the force that destroys every delineated symbol, dragging man into a maze of abstract arguments, destroying not one but every religion.
  • But the images of the gods, or Byzantine mosaics, move the soul to contemplation and preserve the tradition of the undivided light.
(From a new book by John Dunn, to be published later this year.)

© John Dunn.
First posted on www.drjohndunn.com